OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

In the News

Bad news for Fish: lowest fall stream flows moving closer to summer's high temperature

"The problem is that these two events, high temperature and low flow, are very stressful for fish and other aquatic organisms," said Ivan Arismendi, the study's lead author and a research professor in OSU's Department of Fisheries and Wildlife. "Because these two extreme events are occurring more closely to each other, they have less time to recover or adapt to be ready for the next one."

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Cry Me a River

Gordon Grant is a fluvial geomorphologist and research hydrologist with the Forest Service. He has studied the mechanics of the McKenzie as it comes up against competing demands for the river’s water, from urban to agricultural to habitat use as well as changes in land use and climate change. Grant says the McKenzie’s water flows come from two dramatically different systems in the relatively young High Cascades and in the elderly 10 to 20 million-year-old Western Cascade Mountains. “One of the punchlines I like to use is ‘Geology is destiny,’” he says.

Univeristy hosts forum on effects of dams on rivers

“Virtually all dams block the migration of fish,” said Grant, a research hydrologist with the U.S. department of agriculture’s forest service. There are several strategies that can be employed to help fish continue on their seasonal journeys, but all are very expensive.

Dams also block the flow of sediments that sometimes contain harmful chemicals.

“You may have 40, 50, 60 years of agricultural chemicals that may have come down and accumulated in the sediments,” Grant said.

 

A region's vitality melting away

The melting of Mount Hood's signature glaciers raises a crucial question for the region: How much do we depend on them and the cool water they pour into rivers and creeks?

New findings by Oregon State University researchers show that in certain places, the answer is: quite a bit. That is important news for Hood River and its famous fruit crop, which drinks in glacier water throughout the summer.

 

 

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